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The International Sun/Earth Explorer 3 probe is slated to come home in August after 36 years in space, but a group of engineers wants to use it as a platform for citizen science before it does. Sadly, NASA doesn't have the budget to reactivate a probe's that been decommissioned since 1999 -- so, the team has turned to crowdfunding to get the ball rolling. For those who've never heard of the ISEE-3 before, it was originally sent to space to study how the Earth's magnetic field and solar winds interact. Thus, it has 13 different scientific instruments on board (for measuring plasma, magnetic fields, waves and particles) that students or just about anyone can use if the group manages to recapture it.

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For all its advantages, Bitcoin has one major drawback: it's rather hard to spend. While the digital currency has legs in online marketplaces like Overstock and Square Market, few brick and mortar stores are equipped to trade in Bitcoin. Special ATMs help a little, but there has to be a better way. Xapo, a crypto coin storage vault, thinks it's found one: the Bitcoin debit card. Xapo's card promises to work exactly like your bank's plastic -- authorizing transactions by checking the requested charge against your account balance in real time. If the sale is approved, Xapo automatically sells a comparable amount of Bitcoin from the user's wallet to cover the purchase. Xapo says the card should be an improvement on the Bitcoin pre-paid cards that already exist, which require the user to manually refill their plastic before hitting the town.

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In the months since announcing a "mutually beneficial" interconnection agreement, Netflix and Comcast have seen eye to eye on very little. Throw in Comcast's attempt to swallow up Time Warner Cable and grow even larger, and you have a battleground for the two to air their disagreements. Netflix put its opposition to the merger in writing with its most recent earnings report earlier this week, spurring a response from Comcast, and now a pair of more detailed rebuttals from the streaming company (update: and yet another response from Comcast). One is in a blog post by Vice President of Content Delivery Ken Florance, and another is a letter (PDF) by Vice President of Global Public Policy Christopher Libertelli in response to questions from Senator Al Franken. Both argue that Comcast's stance that it deserves payment is flawed because, among other reasons Netflix is still the one that must transmit its data to Comcast's network, where it stops without passing anywhere else.

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moscow kremlin at victory day ...

Russia: the home shirtless autocrats, vodka and a love of free speech rivaled by only China. The Kremlin is taking another step to squash people speaking their mind online. After building out an infrastructure that allows the government to more easily block sites it finds objectionable, now it's building a registry of bloggers. A newly approved law requires anyone who authors a blog in the country to "declare their family name and initials and e-mail address." To make matters worse, if someone's personal blog has more than 3,000 visitors per-day, they'll have to put their names on a special list and abide by a particularly onerous set of restrictions -- the same set of restrictions that many mass media outlets must obey. If they violate those laws, they'll be subject to fines or even have their site suspended for a period of time.

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If you're a porn connoisseur or troll in China, chances are your year hasn't been great so far. Some 110 Chinese porn websites and 3,300 social accounts on services like Sina Weibo and WeChat have gone dark since January as part of the government's new Cleaning The Web 2014 campaign, and that crackdown shows little sign of stopping. It's not just porn that's being hunted, either -- this rigmarole is just as much about clamping down on odious internet rumors as it is about rooting out NSFW pics and slash fiction.

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Amazon box

Amazon isn't waiting for the advent of courier drones to ship your orders faster than usual: the Wall Street Journal reports that the e-commerce giant has been testing its own US delivery network in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Described in job listings as Last Mile, the initiative is meant to outperform established shippers like FedEx and UPS. These companies are increasing costs, can't always meet capacity and are "impeding innovation in delivery services," Amazon says in one job description.

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Apple chief executive Steve Jobs, (L) in

Silicon Valley's tech giants aren't going to face that class action lawsuit over no-hiring deals, after all. Adobe, Apple, Google and Intel have all reached a settlement in the case, which would have otherwise headed to trial in late May. The terms of the deal haven't been revealed, but we wouldn't be shocked if a significant amount of cash traded hands. About 64,000 employees had wanted $3 billion in damages after their bosses reached under-the-table deals to avoid poaching each other's staff; while Intuit, Lucasfilm and Pixar settled last year for just $20 million in total, they're small by comparison.

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The LittleBits Space Kit's International Space Station

Many kids want to become astronauts, but getting them to embrace day-to-day space science is tougher -- it's not as exciting as setting foot on Mars. NASA is all too aware of this challenge, so it has teamed up with LittleBits to create the Space Kit, a build-it-yourself bundle that should make these routine experiments a little more exciting. The pack includes parts and lessons that teach junior Neil Armstrongs and Sally Rides about atmospheric readings, light waves and other aspects of NASA's work without requiring engineering or programming skills. Young ones can even build tiny vehicles of their own, including the International Space Station, a satellite and a planetary rover. The $189 kit won't necessarily lead to a career among the stars, but it could be a good way to spark some curiosity.

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iOS users have been privy to IFTTT's (If This Then That) formulaic behaviors for automating app tasks on their mobile devices. Well as of today, the Android faithful can get in on the action too. The outfit's software is now available in Google Play, bringing with it photo, call, notification, SMS, location and device settings channels specific to Google's OS. What does that mean for you? Well, you can tweak the setup to have your ringtone silenced when you connect to the office WiFi, automatically set your latest Instagram snapshot as your device's wallpaper and get a push notification if you'll need an umbrella tomorrow. Selecting all of those "recipes" can take some time, so we'll let you hop to it via the source link down below.

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If you've been enjoying the second screen-style remote control experience on Hulu Plus for the Chromecast, the streaming video site just announced similar support is coming to other devices. First up are the Hulu Plus apps for PS3, PS4 and Xbox One, and other devices are expected to add support soon. Similar to the second screen control Netflix and YouTube have offered -- Hulu is not using the DIAL protocol those two built yet, but an in-house solution, we're told it will add DIAL support in the future -- you'll need apps on both devices, logged into the same account. Then just punch the cast button, and you can throw video from mobile to TV screen, control playback or browse for something new to watch without interrupting the action onscreen. Also like Netflix it has lock screen controls, so you don't have to unlock your phone or tablet just to press pause. It should be active in the apps already, so all you need to do now is find something to watch.

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